Tag Archives: new path

Small Business Tax Tips – Part 2

Yesterday I posted the first six of 12 tax tips  for small businesses. Here are 7 – 12. Please note every effort has been made to include accurate information, but further research and the advice of a certified tax professional is highly recommended before following any of the tax advice contained here.

7. Help

If you are unsure about anything related to your tax obligations under the law, you should seek professional help from a certified public accountant. Meeting with your CPA quarterly to go over your specific situation will allow him or her to best advise you on what to do to keep your tax bill, and the stress over it, as low as possible.

7a. Update Your Accounting
Spend time each year reviewing your accounting practices to ensure that your books are up-to-date and accurate. Speak with your accountant about your procedures and ask if your current computer accounting system is the right system for your business.

 8. Traps

A small business owner may do some things that are more likely to get IRS attention than others. For example, claiming deductions that exceed your income for more than one year is a definite red flag. The home-office deduction, which is allowable only under specific circumstances, may be another red flag. That’s not to say you shouldn’t claim every deduction you’re entitled to claim, only that you should be especially careful when you do so.

Avoid Common Audit Traps:

  • Classifying Employees as Independent Contractors – Independent contractors and employees are not the same and it is important to understand the difference. In the eyes of the IRS, misclassification can be seen as an attempt to avoid payroll taxes; non-compliance can bring penalties and back taxes.
  • Home Office Deduction – This deduction is very specific and not all home-based businesses qualify. Know how to determine if you are eligible to claim this deduction and what specific expenses may be deducted.
  • Large Sum Miscellaneous Deductions – If you claim a large amount of itemized deductions or miscellaneous expenses, relative to your income, the IRS could get suspicious. Be specific and label every deduction.

9. Meet Deadlines 

April 15 isn’t the only important tax date for business owners. The following dates are important to keep in mind:

  • Annual returns. Most annual returns are due April 15 for unincorporated companies and S corporations. C corporations must file annual corporate returns within two-and-a-half months after the close of their fiscal year.
  • Estimated taxes. Estimated taxes are due four times a year: April 15, June 15, September 15, and January 15.
  • Sales taxes. Sales taxes are due quarterly or monthly, depending on the rules in your state.
  • Employee taxes. Depending on the size of your payroll, employee taxes are due weekly, monthly or quarterly.

10. Keep Business and Personal Expenses Separate

The IRS scrutinizes personal expenses that may have been claimed as a business expense, such as the use of a business vehicle, for personal use. Maintain separate bank and credit card accounts for your business and personal use. Be diligent about keeping good records.

11. Contributions

Many small business owners donate goods or services to charitable organizations throughout the year. Be sure to get a valuation for any non-cash items your business donates to charity so you’ll have the records you need to support the deduction for your contributions.

12. Always Keep Your Tax Documentation for Seven Years 

Although no one is looking for an audit, it is better to have your documentation ready if it happens. Some things like copies of business tax returns, licenses, incorporation papers, and capital equipment expenses should be preserved indefinitely. Keep any tax-related documents (e.g., expense receipts, client 1099 forms, and vehicle mileage logs) for a minimum of seven years.

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For additional information on these tax tips and current year tax deductions visit the SBA Small Business Tax Guide or contact the IRS. Next time we will discuss deductions for your small business in more detail.

Today I Started a New Journey

For as long as I can remember I have wanted to work for myself. Instead I have spent close to 30 years working as a  Research Administrator in Psychiatric Research. The story of how I got there is for another time. Today I want to talk about the future and getting on the right path.

Starting today I am actively working towards getting my consulting business up and running. I will be blogging about the trials and tribulations of starting an online business. I have learned quite a bit over the past 6-8 months that you may need to know. I have made mistakes that I want you to avoid. But I have also not found out about many topics that are crucial – such as getting a license, registering your business, taxes, etc.

If you are interested in following along with me on my journey, please subscribe to my posts. Tomorrow we’ll talk about registering Fictitious names, which is required in the state of Florida. So start thinking about a name for your business.