Tag Archives: tax preparation

Small Business Tax Tips

According to the professionals at the website AllBusiness.com: “Taxes are one of the most important issues facing small and growing businesses. And like a company’s profits, its annual tax bill will in part reflect the owner’s skills and knowledge. Business owners need to be sure that they are meeting all of their responsibilities to the tax man — and also seizing every opportunity to reduce their taxes.”

Here are the first six of 12 tips I gathered from the internet in an attempt to ease the burden of tax preparation and help in preparation for the next deadline. Please note every effort has been made to include accurate information, but further research and the advice of a certified tax professional is highly recommended before following any of the tax advice contained here.

1. Keep Good Records
Proper record-keeping year-round is the first step to ensure taxes are filed accurately. Save essential paperwork that could be needed to back-up deduction claims, should there be an audit. Keep it in mind that tax credits and deductions change each year.

2. Understand Available Deductions
One of the reasons small business owners pay more taxes than necessary is that they don’t take advantage of all of the deductions they’re legally allowed. Often that happens because they can’t prove they are qualified. The most common deductions for small business owners include entertainment, travel, meals, capital assets, home office and health insurance. Travel miles, meals and entertainment deductions require that you maintain a diary with daily entries that tie into receipts and other records.

3. Employee Taxes
If a business has employees, a variety of taxes will have to be withheld from their salaries. Among them are:

  • Withholding. Social Security (FICA), Medicare and federal and state income taxes must be withheld from employees’ pay.
  • Employer matching. Businesses must match the FICA and Medicare taxes and pay them along with employees.
  • Unemployment tax. Businesses must pay federal and state unemployment taxes.

4. Check out Tax Credits 
There are a variety of valuable tax credits available that can reduce your tax liability. These tax credits include Employer Social Security Credit, Disabled Access Credit, Work Opportunity Credit, Research Credit, Investment Credit, and more. Ask your accountant what credits are available for your business.

5. Quarterly Estimated Tax
This area trips up many an entrepreneur and is especially vexing for home-based businesses. Failure to keep up with estimated tax bills can create cash flow problems as well as the potential for punishing IRS penalties. Among the issues are:

  • Who should pay? A business probably must pay quarterly estimated taxes if the total tax bill in a given year will exceed $500.
  • How much should you pay? By the end of the year, either 90% of the tax that is owed or 100 percent of last year’s tax must be paid (the figure is 110% if a business’s income exceeds $150,000). Businesses can subtract their expenses from their income each quarter and apply their income tax rate (and any self-employment tax rate) to the resulting figure (their quarterly profit).

6. Sales Taxes
Most services remain exempt from sales tax, but most products are taxable (typical exceptions are food and drugs). If a business owner sells a product or service that is subject to sales tax, he or she must register with the state’s tax department. Then taxable and nontaxable sales must be tracked and included on the company’s sales tax return.

  • Having what is considered a “presence” in a state is the criteria used by the IRS to determine whether or not you are liable for paying state sales tax.
  • If you do not have a physical presence in another state, but sell items via the Internet or by catalog in that state, you can be subject to a state’s “use tax,” but typically not to their state sales tax. A “presence” in another state does not necessarily mean that you have a retail outlet in that state. If you have an office, warehouse, or employees working for you in that state, the IRS may consider you to have a presence in that state. Make sure you are aware of your sales tax responsibilities in all states in which you are doing business.

We’ll continue with 7-12 in a couple of days.